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Alesis dm6 vs yamaha dtx500k
Alesis dm6 vs yamaha dtx500k

Download Alesis dm6 vs yamaha dtx500k



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Please include what you were doing when this page came up and the CloudFlare Ray ID found at the bottom of this page. Hey everyone! I am looking to get into playing drums (very little experience with hitting around a acoustic set at a friends house) and I have been in the market for a new drum set.

I want to get me a electric drum set because I don't want to make too much noise. I am currently looking at the dm8 usb kit, dm8 pro kit and the dm10 studio kit. I am going to be using a double bass pedal, the type of genre I am going to play is metal, I am not going to be hooking it up to a computer through usb, and I may take it out for small little gigs nothing big but if it's not recommended I have no problem keeping the set at home only.My questions are-1.

Which one do you recommend?2. Why can't the dm10 studio kit be used for small gigging for fun?3. I know I am just a beginner but I would like the kit to last me as I get better, will the dm10 benefit me in the long run?4. I am worried about the problems I have read on setting these up, is it really a lot of trouble? It's making me have second thoughts on getting a electric drum set.I am mostly interested in those three kits, I am placing my order this week, any advice you all can share with me about these kits would be very awesome!

I was also looking at the yamaha dtxexplorer and the yamaha DTX500K but they look pretty plain, should I stay away from these?Thanks in advance! 1.

i only have experience with the DM8 pro (and more experience with a Yamaha Dtxpress kit which i improved with Pintech mesh pads) and it is a really nice kit. the size of the pads (8,10,12 inch toms w/ 12 inch snare) was key to me-once i moved from 8" rubber pads to 10 & 12" Pintechs that was it. the RealHead pads are very nice-i am using a mesh head (Pintech) for my snare but i did test the RealHead first and it worked great i just wanted to use what i had to expand the kit.2.

as far as potential for gigging all three use the same rack so it's only a matter of transporting the pads. the racks don't have memory locks at the joints to aid setting up but you could just mark the joints so that you can set up quickly.

the sound of all three would be the same and you could definitely play gigs with an of them.3. because of the size of the pads, i think the DM8 pro has the edge for growing with you as you progress.4.

there is a learning curve for tweaking electronic drums for the best performance but i don't think it's any more difficult than getting an acoustic kit up and running. acoustic drums need to be tuned and, if you want to record, mic'd up and mixed.

with the DM8 pro i was able to play right out of the box but, because i had experience with setting up my Yamaha kit, i was able to tune the module to my personal taste over the next week or so. you can always just play the kit but, as you do, you'll notice some behaviors that you would like to tune. take the time to read about the different External Trigger settings and what they do, make gradual adjustments.Yamaha: my experience with Yamaha wasn't great but the kit you are looking at is much more advanced than my old dtxpress.

the rubberized pads that i had didn't feel natural at all and the sounds were pretty lame. i would consider other brands before Yamaha-even the way they set up the rack and drums makes it difficult to get a natural layout.you mentioned that you don't want to make too much noise and that is my one concern with the DM8 pro and DM10 studio.

the RealHead pads are noisier than rubber or mesh pads. i would compare the acoustic sound to hitting a book with the drumstick and the kick pad gets a lot of complaints for being too loud. Thanks for the info on the DM8! I was thinking about getting this one or the DM10. I like the sizes of the DM8 but then the DM10 comes with the extra cymbal and pad and it's sort of why I was aiming for the studio kit but I do like the DM8 as well, they both seem like good sets.

I don't know which one to choose lol. I have looked at both and compared but I still don't know. Is the DM8 expandable if I want to add more cymbals and pads to it? Quote from: pbear5 on May 31, 2011, 06:52:40 AM 1. i only have experience with the DM8 pro (and more experience with a Yamaha Dtxpress kit which i improved with Pintech mesh pads) and it is a really nice kit.

the size of the pads (8,10,12 inch toms w/ 12 inch snare) was key to me-once i moved from 8" rubber pads to 10 & 12" Pintechs that was it. the RealHead pads are very nice-i am using a mesh head (Pintech) for my snare but i did test the RealHead first and it worked great i just wanted to use what i had to expand the kit.2.

as far as potential for gigging all three use the same rack so it's only a matter of transporting the pads. the racks don't have memory locks at the joints to aid setting up but you could just mark the joints so that you can set up quickly. the sound of all three would be the same and you could definitely play gigs with an of them.3. because of the size of the pads, i think the DM8 pro has the edge for growing with you as you progress.4. there is a learning curve for tweaking electronic drums for the best performance but i don't think it's any more difficult than getting an acoustic kit up and running.

acoustic drums need to be tuned and, if you want to record, mic'd up and mixed. with the DM8 pro i was able to play right out of the box but, because i had experience with setting up my Yamaha kit, i was able to tune the module to my personal taste over the next week or so.

you can always just play the kit but, as you do, you'll notice some behaviors that you would like to tune. take the time to read about the different External Trigger settings and what they do, make gradual adjustments.Yamaha: my experience with Yamaha wasn't great but the kit you are looking at is much more advanced than my old dtxpress. the rubberized pads that i had didn't feel natural at all and the sounds were pretty lame.

i would consider other brands before Yamaha-even the way they set up the rack and drums makes it difficult to get a natural layout.you mentioned that you don't want to make too much noise and that is my one concern with the DM8 pro and DM10 studio.

the RealHead pads are noisier than rubber or mesh pads. i would compare the acoustic sound to hitting a book with the drumstick and the kick pad gets a lot of complaints for being too loud. I don't have the DM8 but I have the DM7 and DM10.The DM8 looks like the DM7 with a fixed input cable which means no expansion what so ever.

I could be wrong, but go on the Alesis site and dowload the Operators manual and you will see what I mean. I acutally really like my DM7 and have used it for many live gigs but have now gone with the DM10 which has a lot more flexibility and expansion capabilities.

Hope that helps with your decision. DM10x2 Pro with surge cyms + additional surge crash and tom + Roland PD125 snare + Roland KD120 Kick with Iron Cobra double pedals, all with mesh heads(HellFire conversion - BBIII), DM7 USB, USB Pro, Trigger I/O, Tama percussion, Conga's, Bongo's, Roto Toms, cow bell and block. Two excellent replies. Two weeks ago, I was in the same quandry.

I went with the DM10 Studio. I hope Alesis eventually sells the 10" & 12" toms of the DM8 so I can swap out the 8".

PBear5 makes a very compelling point about the size graduation feature of the DM8. I wanted expandability to closely match what I usually play acoustically, and I also wanted the rubber cymbals because of the tap-tap sound of the Surge cymbals (which I really like the look of).

I think that DBW is correct abbout the expandability, AND I think that the DM8 is not dual trigger on all toms. Somebody else, please confirm.I've been playing for 30+ yrs and firgure this is my last drum set purchase.

You, however, have plenty of growth opportutnity and technology will change, just like it does on PCs. I'd put expandability pretty low on my list if I were you; being a good drummer isn't going to happen overnight, and a 4 pc kit will be better to learn how to play drums on, beforeI'm thinking of buying an electric kit to use with Rock Band and without.

My son wants to alesis dm6 vs yamaha dtx500k drums and I want to give my hand and wrists a break from guitar. I'm trying to keep costs low so if anyone could give some decent advise regarding electric drums, that would be great. I've almost already tossed out the idea of buying the ION kit because of mediocre reviews but I might be brought around because of cost alone.

Little help, please? I'm thinking of buying an electric kit to use with Rock Band and without. My son wants to learn drums and I want to give my hand and wrists a break from guitar.

I'm trying to keep costs low so if anyone could give some decent advise regarding electric drums, that would be great. I've almost already tossed out the idea of buying the ION kit because of mediocre reviews but I might be brought around because of cost alone.

Little help, please?DM6 doesn't have a midi out so it won't work very easily in Rock Band(would have to run it through a separate computer via usb if possible) SD5K is little more than an upgraded ION but it is probably a better value.

I would go with the SD5K, you will need a real kick pedal though. have you looked at the Roland HD-1? it's very compact and works great in-game using the MPA and as an electronic kit on its own.I bought mine used for about $400 used.don't know how much the Ions / SD5K go for.but this is a pretty good deal i think. If you lack floor space and want a compact kit, go with the ION.The SD7PK is more substantial (maybe 25% wider/deeper.)The SD7PK is the one I'd recommend.

The SD5K, Ion Drum Rocker, and Alesis DM6 all use exactly the same hardware (pads, cymbals, etc.). The only difference between the 3 is the brain. Of those 3, only the Drum Rocker and SD5K can be played in Rock Band easily. The SD7PK is a much upgraded version of the SD5K.With the SD5K or SD7PK, all you need to use them in RB is a MIDI Pro adapter. http://www.guitarcenter.com/Simmons-SD7PK-Electronic-Drum-Set-106074388-i1541036.gcIf that is too expensive, I have seen cheaper on amazon, e-bay and occasionally craigslist, but I'd go with new from reputable dealer with warranty policy. http://www.guitarcenter.com/Simmons-SD7PK-Electronic-Drum-Set-106074388-i1541036.gcIf that is too expensive, I have seen cheaper on amazon, e-bay and occasionally craigslist, but I'd go with new from reputable dealer with warranty policy.The Simmons brand name is owned by Guitar Center now, even though they're just re-branding Medeli parts (the same company that is used for Ion, Alesis, OSP, Yoki, etc.) with that name, so you're likely to find the best price on a new kit there.

Just wait until a holiday weekend (July 4th is coming up soon), they always have sales then. I'm in a similar situation as the op except I have the Ion's already.

Pads, cymbals are getting worn out and don't really feel it's cost effective to replace what I have with pad mods and new/better cymbals to make it an e-kit. I have been looking at a few different kits (Roland, Yamaha etc) but would like some advice on which models or other brand names work the best with RB. Approx price range $800-$1200 max. Thx in advance. At $700, the new Yamaha DTX500 looks very good.

I'm not sure about other cheap modules, but Yamaha lets you set the open and closed hi-hat independently, so you can do yellow/blue runs (Smoke on the Water, anyone?) easily. Ive bought 2 e-drums sets from ebay and I will recommend to avoid ebay if possible.

Go new.Shipping a drumset takes 4 or 5 boxes, and unless you are an expert packager with all of the shipping materials, people wont package things right.I think my SD7K had $135 of shipping expense.(and the brain was partially broken to boot)The ION was shipped free, but 2 parts were missing so I had to order them on ebay on the side.

Basically negating any "deal" and adding 4-6 weeks of time.I also had to order some extra pads and cymbals on ebay to make things complete. Thx for the advice so far.@defdog99 Sounds like you have had a rough time with online purchases/shipping. Fortunately for me the only problem I've had was they shipped the X-box brain with my Ion kit not the PS3 brain.A couple options i do have is from a local web site that is selling a Yamaha DTXpress IV for $800 and a Roland TD3 for $850.

Both kits are used but look like they are still in decent shape from the pictures they have posted. The Roland seems to have more extras (mesh head on snare, double kick). Would pick it up if I had $850 atm.Heard any good/bad about how these 2 kits work with RB? A couple options i do have is from a local web site that is selling a Yamaha DTXpress IV for $800 and a Roland TD3 for $850. Both kits are used but look like they are still in decent shape from the pictures they have posted.

The Roland seems to have more extras (mesh head on snare, double kick). Would pick it up if I had $850 atm.Heard any good/bad about how these 2 kits work with RB?The only difference in how those two work with RB3 is that you can't use the HH pedal on the TD-3 to switch your HH between Yellow and Blue.

But you can on the DTXpress. Other than that, they're functionally the same. Sign In or Register to comment.� Privacy Policy� Terms of Use� User Content Submission� Copyright ComplianceESRB - Rating Pending�2013 HARMONIX MUSIC SYSTEMS, INC.

ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. HARMONIX, ROCK BAND, DANCE CENTRAL, VIDRHYTHM, PHASE AND ALL RELATED TITLES AND LOGOS ARE TRADEMARKS OF HARMONIX MUSIC SYSTEMS, INC. ROCK BAND, DANCE CENTRAL, VIDRHYTHM, PHASE AND OTHER RELATED PRODUCTS AND SERVICES DEVELOPED BY HARMONIX MUSIC SYSTEMS, INC. THE BEATLES IS A TRADEMARK OF APPLE CORPS LTD. XBOX 360 AND KINECT ARE TRADEMARKS OF MICROSOFT CORPORATION IN THE UNITED STATES AND/OR OTHER COUNTRIES.

�PLAYSTATION� AND �EYETOY� ARE REGISTERED TRADEMARKS OF SONY COMPUTER ENTERTAINMENT INC. GUITAR HERO IS A REGISTERED TRADEMARK OF ACTIVISION PUBLISHING, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. ALL LOGOS, COMPANY NAMES, BRANDS, IMAGES, TRADEMARKS AND OTHER INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY ARE THE PROPERTY OF THEIR RESPECTIVE OWNERS. Yamaha DTX drum specialist Tom Griffin demonstrates the Yamaha DTX500K electronic drum set at Kraft Music.Find exclusive Yamaha DTX electronic drum BUNDLE packages at Kraft Music.

Our drum bundles ship with all the hardware and accessories you'll need for home, stage, or studio at one low price.http://www.kraftmusic.com/drums/elect. Hey all, firstly I apologise if I'm travelling over new ground here!! I'm an absolute beginner with no experience other than a few lessons and I'm looking at buying a decent electronic drum kit on a minimum budget for now. I am currently learning on a Yamaha DTX500 and seems ok to me (remember it's the only drum kit I have hit) and was wondering if I would be better looking for one of those of a better 2nd hand kit.

I have found a dtx500 for sale on ebay for quite a decent price and was hoping for some advice before I bid. Nothing too technical please guys as it may go way over my head lol.

Thanks in advance!! The DTX 500 is a decent starter kit, although the limitations are a tom pad for a hi-hat instead of a cymbal pad. and all the cymbals are single zone and those little tiny trapezoid things.If you can afford it, I would definitely suggest grabbing up the 520.

Trust me, the DTX snare is quite the nice pad and if you're just learning to play you'll want the DTX snare to practice your left and right hand technique. It really makes practicing the snare something fun.And if you want something that feels the best next to an acoustic kit, stay as far away from the Roland Mesh pads as humanly possible.

They are WAY WAY to bouncy.This is just one guy's personal opinion.Peace, Defender And if you want something that feels the best next to an acoustic kit, stay as far away from the Roland Mesh pads as humanly possible. They are WAY WAY to bouncy.I have a roland td12, which has mesh heads, and they are definitely very bouncy, but i enjoy playing them, and I mean are they really any further from an acoustic than any other electronic drums?

probably not. They have nice sounds/samples and I can play almost as long as I want because the noise doesn't distract anyone.Yamaha and roland both make the best sounding samples for their electronic kits in my opinion. stay away from legend, alesis and ashton if you want to score in the sound department. Ultimately, I will never use an electronic kit when performing unless playing techno.

But an electric kit is a great start. Try and have a play on an acoustic kit once a week if you can, (not sure if you are in college/school), just so you can get used to both, because playing on an acoustic for the first time can be very strange after playing an electric kit for your whole drumming career.The yamaha will definitely give you enough options to continue to expand your drumming skills for easily three years, before needing to uprgrade/expand.Goodluck with your purchase!

and have fun with your new drums :) If you really are a day-one absolute beginner, then the DTX500 is perfectly fine. Yes the silicone pads of the more expensive kits are better and yes the experience of using a tom pad as a hi-hat is not optimal, but the DTX500 module only gives you open and closed hat sounds and if you find you are becoming a drummer after you practice a while, you can easily resell the DTX500 and look at the DTX700 range for when you are ready to play more advanced material.I say this because if you have so far not played acoustics, or silicone, or mesh, then there is nothing wrong with starting out practicing on rubber.

You will adapt to any future upgrade in a few minutes. And then if you decide you would rather play the trombone, your drums investment will be have been kept at a minimum. Thanks for the reply guys. I really am a day one beginner in the sense of I've had a handful of lessons and seem to pick quite a lot of it up quite quickly.

It's something I'm extremely interested in pursuing and am far far from school/college (31 now lol). The 3 kits I had my eye on are the Yamaha DTX500, Alesis DM6 and the Roland TD3(2nd hand).

Regarding sounds etc, as long as it has something as authentic as possible i'm happy. My reasons for electronic is purely down to me having a 2 year old child and wife that may not appreciate the constant beating of a beginner.I'm sure if I had a few years practice she wouldn't mind as with the guitar. An Acoustic set is something that once I'm sure the drums are for me and my ability increases that I will purchase but for now I'm kinda hands tied to an electric! The 3 kits I had my eye on are the Yamaha DTX500, Alesis DM6 and the Roland TD3(2nd hand).Between those three the Yamaha is by far the best.

Plus it has a decent resale value. The DM6 is not very good in my opinion. Of those 3, I'd get the Yamaha.I'd go with the Yamaha also. While I was looking for my new set I did a mess load of research. The Yamaha set by far has the best samples available in an e-kit.Then would come the Roland and lastly, I wouldn't even consider the Alesis kit. I've heard nothing but bad things about Alesis.

And the fact that everyone says it takes literally forever to tune the pads up right because it's not correct out of the box plus the fact that everyone seems to talk about how unreliable their kits are.I hope this helps, Defender announcements Art AskReddit askscience aww blog books creepy dataisbeautiful DIY Documentaries EarthPorn europe explainlikeimfive food funny Futurology gadgets gaming GetMotivated gifs history IAmA InternetIsBeautiful Jokes LifeProTips listentothis mildlyinteresting movies Music news nosleep nottheonion OldSchoolCool personalfinance philosophy photoshopbattles pics science Alesis dm6 vs yamaha dtx500k space sports television tifu todayilearned TwoXChromosomes ukraina UpliftingNews videos worldnews WritingPrompts edit subscriptions � front� - all� - random|� AskReddit� - funny� - worldnews� - news� - todayilearned� - gifs� - videos� - pics� - gaming� - aww� - Showerthoughts� - movies� - television� - mildlyinteresting� - nottheonion� - Jokes� - LifeProTips� - IAmA� - Music� - OldSchoolCool� - tifu� - space� - TwoXChromosomes� - europe� - photoshopbattles� - explainlikeimfive� - science� - creepy� - personalfinance� - WritingPrompts� - books� - Futurology� - sports� - UpliftingNews� - history� - food� - Documentaries� - EarthPorn� - nosleep� - DIY� - dataisbeautiful� - GetMotivated� - askscience� - Art� - gadgets� - listentothis� - InternetIsBeautiful� - philosophy� - ukraina� - announcements� - blogmore � use the following search parameters to narrow your results: subreddit: subreddit find submissions in "subreddit" author: username find submissions by "username" site: example.com find submissions from "example.com" url: text search for "text" in url selftext: text search for "text" in self post contents self:yes (or self:no) include (or exclude) self posts nsfw:yes (or nsfw:no) include (or exclude) results marked as NSFWe.g.

subreddit:aww site:imgur.com dogsee the search faq for details.advanced search: by author, subreddit. Read Medrummit's videosdrummit's picturesdrummit's commentsdrummit's chat roomDrumless TracksHearing ProtectionDrummer StretchesCymbal stacking demosIdeas for old/broken cymbalsCymbal series organized by priceMy cymbals keep breakingAngry neighboursHow to mic your kitCrash ridesDrum chart organized by brands and priceShipping drumsDrum Tuning BibleLearn Rhythmic Reading40 Essential Snare Drum RudimentsRudiment a DayThe Rudiment EncyclopediaErgonomicsHow to treat TendonitisFree Drum LessonsMike's LessonsDrum Magazine's LessonsPlay Along TracksKind BeatsCymbalholic ForumsGhostnote ForumsFunkletDrummertalkThe Trap SetDrummer's ResourceGrooves of DoomNoteflightPercussion Education mobile || drums subs || self posts || collab || Buy/Sell || AMAs I want to buy my husband an electric drum set for Christmas but I don't know anything about them.

Not sure if this is right subreddit, but I am hoping someone can help. ( self.drums)submitted 1 year ago * by PrincessPleia So my husband is a guitar player and has been for many years (not professionally or anything) but he's always been interested in playing the drums. For Christmas this year I would love to buy him an electric drum set, but I have no idea what to get him.

I'm looking for some guidance and advice as it's a bit overwhelming trying to research. I want a good drum set but something within my price range (trying to stay under $500).

Any help or maybe direction to a different subreddit would be greatly appreciated! thank youEDIT - You have all been so incredibly helpful, thank you thank you. My pregnant self wants to cry I feel so grateful. I've been doing this at work so once I get home I have to be much more secretive!

I have a lot of research to do and I appreciate the information everyone has given. I feel more prepared to get him something great :-)� 48 comments� share You should look into Roland and Yamaha. Stay away from Alesis are made pretty shitty most of the time.Look for any of the Yamaha dtx lines (dtxeplorer, dtxpress,dtx500 dtx450).As for Roland they're a little out of your price range unless you buys used.

And if you can afford mesh heads get those!� permalink� embed� save� give gold There are some no-name cheap kits around that would put you off electronics for life if they were the first e-kit you tried. At the other end of the spectrum are some niche builders that make amazing drums, which they tend to pair with Roland modules, but these will probably be out of your price range.

So I'd suggest you go for a Roland, Yamaha or possibly Alesis kit. (Unless you are very tight on space, avoid the very bottom end all-in-one Roland kit as it is very limited on expansion capabilities).Rubber pads are ok for toms, but mesh heads are much nicer and more realistic to play, so try to get at least a mesh snare. I think Yamaha have some silicon head drums that are meant to be very realistic too, but I haven't had an opportunity to try for myself.The module (drum brain) is much more important than the drums themselves since it is what makes the sounds that you and the audience will hear.

If you have to choose between better pads and a better module, go for the better module.Store bought kits normally come with the drum pads, cymbal pads, kick pad, module, cables, rack and clamps. You can set them up/move them around to suit where you want them to be. You will need to source a kick pedal, throne, sticks and any amplification you want yourself. Depending on the high hat in the kit, you may also need your own high hat stand.Seriously consider buying second hand, these things tend to be pretty robust since they need to survive being hit with sticks a lot.

I got my old Roland TD6 kit and the various additions to it from private sellers on ebay, you can get some great deals if you are willing to wait for the right opportunity. Some e-drummers feel the need to always have the latest and greatest kit, so getting a second hand previous generation kit is probably the most cost effective. Often the second hand kits have had extra pads or parts upgraded by the owner already, or will include the kick pedal, throne, etc.

so pay attention to what they list as included in ebay listings.It is important to note that an electronic kit will not be completely silent. The kick in particular can be a problem as it will sound like you are repeatedly stamping on the floor for the person below if you aren't careful.� permalink� embed� save� give gold Wow, thanks. Having a little bit of knowledge about what I'm shopping for is so helpful and you've given me a lot, so thank you.

I appreciate all the advice everyone has given, but you've given me more to go on then just "go with this brand" so thank you for taking the time to respond.We are having a baby in April so I thought that an electric drum set would be perfectly quiet, at least now I know not to place it next to the baby's room.� permalink� embed� save� parent� give gold My little girl (18 months) has loved playing my drums since she could hold a stick, but it can be nice to be able to turn the volume down when she decides it is time for another session of flailing around hitting everything in reach!� permalink� embed� save� parent� give gold haha, that sounds adorable!

We are having a boy and I can't wait to see my husband share music with him and watch him try to strum on his guitars, and beat on the drums now too!� permalink� embed� save� parent� give gold Buy used, they don't generally hold their value so you can get some bargains on places like craigslist.

I got a Roland td6v for $600 (Canadian) and it works perfectly. The Roland kits can take a beating so unless it's been dropped down a flight of stairs, a used kit will work just as good as new.

Get Roland or Yamaha, generally any model will be fine for a beginner.� permalink� embed� save� give gold As already mentioned, don't forget headphones! You can get noise cancelling Vic Firth headphones at Guitar Center for $50. http://www.guitarcenter.com/Vic-Firth,Noise-Canceling-Headphones-Headphones,New-Gear.gcI was fortunate enough to get them for 30 on sale, so look out.

I would also recommend getting an auxiliary cord that can connect an ipod into the computer module part of the e-kit. You can get them ve� New Topics� Today's Posts� Mark Channels Read� Member List� Home�� Forum�� Technologies for Worship�� Instrument Discussions, Reviews� If this is your first visit, be sure tocheck out the FAQ by clicking thelink above. You may have to registerbefore you can post: click the register link above to proceed. To start viewing messages,select the forum that you want to visit from the selection below. Hi all.

As I mentioned in my recent Intro post, our church is currently experiencing some growth, both in numbers attending, but also in terms of space, as we extend and enhance our buildings. Our new worship space is around 60% bigger than the old one, but with far better acoustics.

This has given us a real issue with the volume of our drums, which is affecting both our other musicians and the congregation. We have explored the "ask them to play more gently", "play with brushes" type options, but have found it's just not a reliable solution. So, given that we now have this awesome new sound desk, with about 3,000 channels, I've pretty much decided to invest in an electronic drum kit.

So, I'm hoping to get some practical advice on what kit(s) we should look at.I'll preface by saying a few things: 1. I'm not a drummer, nor do I play or read music (I'm just a guy who loves the Lord and can sing in tune). 2. I'm based in Australia, so there may be a difference in availability and price of gear. 3. For various reasons, I can't involve my main drummer too much in this decision.

It would be great if I could, say, narrow it down to two kits, then give him the final say.What I'm looking for is an electronic kit that:1.

Sounds like real drums, at least, as far as that matters for congregational worship.2. Will "feel" ok to our drummers3. If this is feasible, a kit that can be readily switched for right and left-handed players (if this can be done mid-service, it would be a great benefit).We're not interested particularly in how many "voices" the kit has or how well it lends itself for recording, for example.

We just need a drum kit that sounds and feels like "drums" and would be suitable for an auditorium that seats around 250.I've done a little resarch locally and it looks like the brands I'll need to choose from are Alesis, Roland and Yamaha. Our budget is not huge - around $1,000 to $1,300 - which, here in Oz, might get us, say, a Yamaha DTX500K, Alesis DM-10 studio, or nearly stretch to a Roland TD11K.

On the other hand, if we can spend less and still meet our criteria, I'd be very happy (and so would the Church Board). I'm wondering, for example, what advantages an Alesis DM-10 studio would have, for congregational worship, over the cheaper Alesis DM8 PRO or much cheaper Alesis DM6 USB, or the Roland TD11K over the Roland HD3?Any advice you can give would be very much appreciated.Thanks,Marc H I really don't have anything about specific models, but I do have some expereince with electronic drums in church.First, there are two major components to a electronic drum system.

The drums themselves, and the control module, which has the different sounds of the drums. Most times, they are sold together, but not always. The Roland units seem to get the best reviews on having "authentic" drum sounds.Second, for the "feel" of real drums, you will have to spend some money. Look for two things: the "feel" of the drum heads, but also the ability to have different "zones" on the cybmals, hihat, and snare drum.

This gives the drummer the ability to get differing sounds from each, depending on which "zone" they hit the drum/cymbal at.

A drummer will love you for that, as this is what makes them sound like real drums!!Other than that, I don't have much more to offer. Good luck with your search!!! Thanks for your advice visionman. I'll be sure to take those things into account.On doing a little more research and phoning around, I'm starting to think that the left / right-handed thing might be a problem for us: our main drummer plays left-handed but our up-and-coming new teenage player is a right-hander.

With the acoustic kit, it's relatively easier to switch these around, but with the electronic, the components are clamped to a stand and, presumably, plugged or wired in, which might be difficult to re-arrange. Does anyone have any experience in this?Thanks,Marc H Mark,I found this page talking about adjusting certain Rolard kits for use by left handed players. I'm sure they make it sound easier than it really is, but at least it's possible! As long as your not planning on switching drummers mid-service, it could probably work!http://www.roland.co.uk/blog/can-you.handed-playing Hey man welcome to the forums!I have dealt alot with acoustic vs electric sets in many of the churches I've been involved with.

I have also helped many different ministries with their acoustic circumstances. I would like to first say, getting an electric drum set will improve your sound, but not just that electric drums sets would improve the sound of pretty much any church regardless of how big the budget is for acoustic treatment and good p.a.

equipment.High-end electric drumsets and on par with high-end acosutic drums sets, they didn't used to be, but we not in the 90's anymore haha electric drum sets are probably one of the biggest things to have imporved over the last 20 years for the music industry.

that being said:Getting an electric drumset would help you have more volume control over the drums/// i.e. you can control the volume of the kick drum the toms the cymballs all serperately without bleed from other mics, you can better choose what sound you want for the specific building your in etc.This will help with stage noise(no other musicians have to worry about the drums being to loud), and also help with the sound of the drumset in the actual room you are playing in.High-end roland systems are good, but not great.

you asked what feels the most real and sounds the most real? The Pear E-Pro Drums. They look identical to an acoustic set, and the heads can even be changed to acoustic heads if you want to play the set acoustically at some point. It sounds the best of any electric set, looks the best, and feels the best for the drummer.Every church that I have converted to electric sets and had previously used Roland or Yamaha systems said they would never go back. I currently am the Worship Arts Director at Church of the Open Door, we have 2 campuses and 3 venues, each of the venues had many sound issues that we tried to fix in different ways because of the acoustic sets, the final solution was electric drum set to the dismay of the drummers, but its sounds a thousand times better and they really liked the E-pro's for feel.http://www.e-prolive.com/In regard to playing left handed and right handed, if you don't keep all the chords linked together you can just switch the position of drums and cymbals however you want whenever.

Not as fast as switching acoustic sets around, but still the same thinking. Cody,Which e-pearl set do you recommend for churches? I checked them out online, and I read some pretty discouraging comments about them from users, mostly in regards to the cymbals. People said you had to tighten them down a lot, restricting their movement (thus, making them not behave like acoustic cymbals) or they would soon break.

Also, several people said the sound of drumsticks hitting the cymbals was easy to hear over the sound of the drums, and the band. Maybe in a huge church where they crank the sound that wouldn't be an issue, but in a smaller church (100 or even less) that doesn't play at rock concent levels.do you think it would be an issue?I'm not looking to buy any drums just yet at my new church (startup, about 30 in attendance at the moment), but possibly in the future!

Thanks! Check out what you can find used, also. Your local GC or even GC Online you may find a good used set in your price range.Generally speaking, the Yamaha and Roland are the preferred e-drums.I'll say up front� Explora Home� Photography� Video� Audio� Computers� Home Entertainment� Mobile� Videos� Shop Categories� Photography� Computers� Pro Video� Lighting� Pro Audio� Mobile� TVs & Entertainment� Camcorders� Surveillance� Optics & Outdoor� Audio-Visual� Used Dept� Pro Audio� A/V Presentation� Binoculars & Scopes� Computers� Darkroom� Digital Photography� Cameras & Photo Gear� Lighting & Studio� Filters & Accessories� Home & Portable Entertainment� Video & Surveillance� Cashin your Gear Most orders* over $49 qualify for .Orders placed after 4pm on weekdays will not ship until the next business day.

Orders placed after 12pm Fridays will not ship until the following Monday.Faster shipping methods may be available; just upgrade during checkout.*Some exclusions apply.Close � All� All� News� Buying Guides� Reviews� Tips� Features� Photography� News� Buying Guides� Reviews� Tips� Features� Video� News� Buying Guides� Reviews� Tips� Features� Audio� News� Buying Guides� Reviews� Tips� Features� Computers� News� Buying Guides� Reviews� Tips� Features� Home Entertainment� News� Buying Guides� Reviews� Tips� Features� Mobile� News� Buying Guides� Reviews� Tips� Features� Videos Beginner, amateur and pro drummers all share the same dilemma: alesis dm6 vs yamaha dtx500k one, not even their closest family members and friends, wants to hear them banging away, loudly practicing their chops.

Thankfully, these musicians have the option of using electronic drums, which allow them to play amazing-sounding kits in relative peace and quiet, day or night. Electronic drum kits have many other perks, like built-in metronomes and training tools that help you improve your timing skills and teach you new rhythms. The sound libraries in electronic drums allow percussionists to tap into unique tones and really explore new sonic territory.In this roundup, we'll review several popular models and explain their differences, from entry-level units like the Yamaha DD-65, to full-blown systems like the Roland TD-9KX2.

We�ve created a chart for each manufacturer that breaks down the differences between their products. It�s a quick way for you to find the drum kit that suits your needs best. Keep an eye out for drum pads and cymbals that have �multiple zones.� They enable you to trigger more than one sound simultaneously, such as a rim shot and a snare sound.There are a couple of things that every model in this article has in common. They all have an auxiliary audio input, which is a jack that allows you to connect an MP3 or CD player, so you can play along with your favorite music.

All electronic drum kits are compact, and take up less physical space than acoustic drums. Most models don�t have built-in speakers, so you�re going to need to an external amp or a pair of headphones to hear yourself. Most models also don�t include a kick drum pedal or a drum throne. Let�s kick this thing off� one, two, three, four!

AlesisThe Alesis DM6 Session Kit features five drum pads (one of which is dual zone), three cymbals, kick and hi-hat pedals. The included DM6 Drum Module has 108 sounds, 40 built-in music tracks that you can play along with, and a USB port that�s compatible with Windows and Mac computers.

If you own drum software like BFD, Toontrack�or XLN Audio Addictive Drums, you can connect the DM6 directly to your computer through its USB port. The DM6�Kit sends MIDI�notes to the computer to trigger the software, making it possible to play and record with vast libraries of sounds. The DM6 can also play instruments in iPad apps by connecting its USB port to an Apple iPad.The Alesis DM6 USB Kit has the same dual zone snare pad and DM6 Drum Module as the DM6 Session Kit, but this model comes with the more responsive �ProPad� tom drums, kick pad and cymbals.The Alesis DM10 Studio Kit comes with six RealHead drum pads (five of which are dual-zone), and the powerful DM10 drum module which packs over 1000 sounds.

The RealHead drum pads feature Mylar drum heads for an authentic feel. The DM10 module has a wide range of acoustic and electronic drum sounds, the ability to load sounds through its USB port, and it can trigger MIDI instruments via USB. You can record your performances, connect to an iPad (the iPad Camera Connection Kit is required), and play along with built-in music tracks.If you prefer drums that are larger than 8" in diameter, check out the Alesis DM10 X Kit.

It features the same DM10 sound module as the DM10 Studio kit, but it comes with three larger 12" and two 10" RealHead pads, and larger cymbals as well. The included chrome-plated XRack stand features four posts for more stability.Single-Zone PadsMulti-Zone PadsModule / Number of SoundsSpecial FeatureKick-Drum PedalDM6 Session Kit3 x Pro Pads1 x 8� DMPad snareDM6, 108Compatible with iPad appsIncluded3 x Pro Pad cymbals1 x Kick PadDM6 USB Kit3 x DM Pads1 x 8� DMPad snareDM6, 108Upgraded pads, compatible with iPad appsNot included3 x DM Cymbals1 x Kick PadDM10 Studio Kit1 x Kick Pad4 x 8� RealHead PadsDM10, 1047Load new sound sets through USB, top panel mixerNot included4 x Cymbal Pads1 x 10� RealHead PadDM10 X Kit1 x RealHead Kick Pad3 x 12� RealHead PadsDM10, 1047Load new sound sets through USB, top panel mixerNot included2 x 14� Crashes2 x 10� RealHead Pads1 x 16� Ride1 x 12� Hi-HatRolandThe Roland HD-1 features a mesh-head snare drum pad, which makes a stick rebound more naturally, and also emits the least amount of acoustic noise.

It has 10 drum kits, with everything from a sweet acoustic jazz kit, to electronic drums, to a heavy metal kit with double-bass drums. You should also consider picking up the TDM-1 Secure Performance Mat, a nylon floor covering that's designed to fit an HD-1.

It reduces vibration noise and protects your flooring.The Roland HPD-10 HANDSONIC was designed to be played with your bare hands, and it�s loaded with instruments like tablas, cajons, steel drums, sound effects, orchestral sounds and full acoustic drum sets.

There are 400 sounds built in and you play them with its 10 velocity- and pressure-sensitive pads. You can use the pressure sensitivity to bend the pitch of a note, as you would on a traditional hand drum. A�D-Beam controller is built in, which allows you to liven up your rhythms with even more sounds, such as vibra-slaps and bar chimes.

A dynamic metronome is built in. Add a BC-HPD-10 custom sized carrying bag to your cart and you'll have everything you need to use your space bongo on the go.The Roland SPD-30 Octapad isn�t a drum kit; it�s an all-in-one percussion instrument with eight trigger pads. It has 50 drum kits with more than 600 built-in sounds.

There are 30 effects, EQs, ambience, pitch, muffling and tone controls. Phrase looping is built in, and you can add four more trigger pads (including a hi-hat controller), so you can transform it into a full drum set. With USB and MIDI�connectivity, the SPD-30 can be used to trigger other devices. B&H sells a custom Octapad SPD-30 Value Bundle that includes a pair of studio headphones, the PSD10 Pad Stand, a Boss FS-5U footswitch and a pair of wood drum sticks.The Roland SPD-SX is also an all-in-one percussion instrument, but this one has nine trigger pads, each of which has an LED to let you know its status, and there are illuminated divider lines between the pads so you can clearly see them on a dimly lit stage.

It has 2GB of internal memory, and two audio inputs (line and mic), so you can sample sounds directly into the device. You can add two more drum pads and a footswitch to the unit. It has MIDI and USB ports, three built-in effects units that can be tweaked in real time with hardware knobs and a high-contrast LCD screen.The Roland TD-4K2 is the most affordable kit in the acclaimed V-Compact Series of electronic drums.

It features 25 authentic sounding drum kits, a special built-in training coach with recording and playback, and the dual-zone PDX-8 10" mesh snare pad. It�s also the first kit in this article to feature a dual-zone cymbal pad.

The 12" Roland CY-8 l



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